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Headland Park

Barangaroo's Headland Park will be a spectacular place for everyone to enjoy. It will complete the transformation of one of Sydney’s oldest industrial sites into a sprawling six-hectare harbour foreshore park providing a new vantage point for Sydneysiders and visitors alike to soak up the action on Sydney Harbour while revelling in lush naturalistic parkland.

Headland Park will provide space for recreation, expression, celebration, and community. It will feature bush walks, grassed areas, lookouts, walking and cycle paths, and a new harbour cove. It will also feature unique tidal rock pools created from sandstone excavated directly from the Barangaroo site, offering the closest connection to Sydney Harbour that any foreshore park ever has.

Headland Park will feature a new cultural centre with an anticipated floor area of up to 18,000 sqm for potential uses within the public recreation zone, and an underground 300-space car park.

Location

Headland Park is located at the northern end of Barangaroo where it meets Millers Point. Named after Cameragal woman Barangaroo, an influencing voice in the early days of colonial Sydney and the second wife of cross-cultural Bennelong, the area is rich in history and symbolic for Australians across all cultures.

History

Naturalistic Design

An international tender process was held for the park’s design in 2009/2010 with Johnson Pilton Walker in association with Peter Walker and Partners Landscape Architecture, landing the contract. The team’s winning design juxtaposes a rugged sandstone topography inspired by the naturalistic pre-1836 shoreline of the historic Port Jackson area, against a flourishing and modern CBD. It transforms a disused shipping container yard into one of Sydney’s most stunning green headlands, visually linking the headland archipelagos of Balls Head, Goat Island and Ballast Point.

“One of the elements of the harbour headlands is that in their natural form they were examples of the bush. They still play a strong part of this symbolic meaning of the Sydney Cove area so we were determined to recreate that rich, complicated and more interesting plant composition for the forum of the headland, while adding a dimension of naturalness to the overall park.” Peter Walker, Landscape Architect and Lead Designer, Headland Park

Incorporating native Sydney plants such as large Angophoras, Banksias and Port Jackson and Moreton Bay fig trees, the vegetation element follows very strictly on the vocabulary of the natural bush when the Aboriginal Gadigal people were living there.

Sustainable construction

In line with Barangaroo’s commitment to sustainability, Headland Park foreshore edge and the northern cove will be created from sandstone extracted from the site. Up to 37,000 cubic metres of Sydney’s iconic Hawkesbury sandstone will be a key feature, reminiscent of the naturally occurring sandstone foreshores throughout Sydney Harbour

Headland Park is due for completion in 2015.

 

  • Park Size
    5.74

    hectares

  • Sandstone Blocks
    9,315

    on foreshore

  • Species
    84

    natives